Healthcare

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Are you interested in how the human body works?
Are you good at studying and analyzing information?
Would you like to look under a microscope?
Is science a favorite subject?

 

What it takes:

  • Compassion for helping others.
  • Strong science, math and computer skills.
  • Personal dedication and determination.
  • Ability to work on a team.
  • Willingness to be a life-long learner.

 

Look around you...

Healthcare offers career choices for those interested in working directly with people, operating high-tech tools, or working behind the scenes in research and development. Working environments can vary from very high-paced situations, like emergency room care, or slower-paced situations, like researching and developing medicines or medical devices, like prosthetics or dialysis machinery. Research labs, health clubs, hospitals, clinics, nursing homes and doctor offices are all looking for dedicated and compassionate people to work in the Healthcare industry.

If you enjoy helping others and want a career that makes a direct difference in people’s lives, Healthcare may be the right choice for you. After successfully completing high school, some positions offer short- term training in order to be qualified to do certain types of work. Pharmacy Technicians are one of those careers. Emergency Medical Technicians (EMT) and Paramedics receive high-skilled, specialty training in one year or less at community colleges. Other careers require a two-year associates degree, like Registered Nurses, Medical Coders and Medical Laboratory Technicians. Many Healthcare careers require a bachelor’s degree or advanced degrees. In addition to education and training requirements, many Healthcare careers require certification and licensure and life-long learning.

 

Career Spotlight

Physical Therapist

Physical Therapists (PTs) are healthcare professionals who work with many different people. They work with people of all ages, from newborn babies to the elderly, and backgrounds. They diagnose and treat medical problems or conditions that limit mobility or daily activities, like athletic or work-related injuries, amputees, those recovering from illness or neurological disorders. Physical Therapists help people increase strength and mobility, and improve or correct disabling conditions resulting from disease or injury. They can also help patients manage pain, show them how to properly use medical equipment, like wheelchairs, crutches or walkers, and show patients specific exercises that aid in their recovery.

Physical Therapists are required to have state licensure and an advanced degree, Doctor of Physical Therapy (DPT). Students interested in becoming Physical Therapists should first successfully complete high school. Then they should pursue T  a bachelor’s degree focusing in the sciences. Most DPT programs require study in anatomy, biology, physiology, chemistry and physics. Most DPT programs are three years long, with an additional year in a clinical residency program. Additionally, some Physical Therapists choose to specialize further by completing a fellowship program.